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Running integration tests on Google Cloud Build using docker-compose

Running integration tests on Google Cloud Build using docker-compose

This post is a direct follow-up to Microservices test architecture where I’ve introduced new kinds of tests to our example project. Wild Workouts uses Google Cloud Build as CI/CD platform. It’s configured in a continuous deployment manner, meaning the changes land on production as soon as the pipeline passes. If you consider our current setup, it’s both brave and naive. We have no tests running there that could save us from obvious mistakes (the not-so-obvious mistakes can rarely be caught by tests, anyway).

Repository secure by design: how to sleep better without fear of security vulnerabilities

Repository secure by design: how to sleep better without fear of security vulnerabilities

Thanks to the tests and code review, you can make your project bug-free. Right? Well… actually, probably not. That would be too easy. 😉 These techniques lower the chance of bugs, but they can’t eliminate them entirely. But does it mean we need to live with the risk of bugs until the end of our lives? Over one year ago, I found a pretty interesting PR in the harbor project. This was a fix for the issue that allowed to create admin user by a regular user.

Microservices test architecture. Can you sleep well without end-to-end tests?

Microservices test architecture. Can you sleep well without end-to-end tests?

Do you know the rare feeling when you develop a new application from scratch and can cover all lines with proper tests? I said “rare” because most of the time, you will work with software with a long history, multiple contributors, and not so obvious testing approach. Even if the code uses good patterns, the test suite doesn’t always follow. Some projects have no modern development environment set up, so there are only unit tests for things that are easy to test.

Combining DDD, CQRS, and Clean Architecture by refactoring a Go project

Combining DDD, CQRS, and Clean Architecture by refactoring a Go project

In the previous articles, we introduced techniques like DDD Lite, CQRS, and Clean (Hexagonal) Architecture. Even if using them alone is beneficial, they work the best together. Like Power Rangers. Unfortunately, it is not easy to use them together in a real project. In this article, I will show you how to connect DDD Lite, CQRS, and Clean Architecture in the most pragmatic and efficient way. Why should I care? Working on a programming project is similar to planning and building a residential district.

Introducing basic CQRS by refactoring a Go project

Introducing basic CQRS by refactoring a Go project

It’s highly likely you know at least one service that: has one big, unmaintainable model that is hard to understand and change, or where work in parallel on new features is limited, or can’t be scaled optimally. But often, bad things come in threes. It’s not uncommon to see services with all these problems. What is an idea that comes to mind first for solving these issues? Let’s split it into more microservices!

Introducing Clean Architecture by refactoring a Go project

Introducing Clean Architecture by refactoring a Go project

The authors of Accelerate dedicate a whole chapter to software architecture and how it affects development performance. One thing that often comes up is designing applications to be “loosely coupled”. The goal is for your architecture to support the ability of teams to get their work done—from design through to deployment—without requiring high-bandwidth communication between teams. Accelerate If you haven’t read Accelerate yet, I highly recommend it.

4 practical principles of high-quality database integration tests in Go

4 practical principles of high-quality database integration tests in Go

Did you ever hear about a project where changes were tested on customers that you don’t like or countries that are not profitable? Or even worse – did you work on such project? It’s not enough to say that it’s just not fair and not professional. It’s also hard to develop anything new because you are afraid to make any change in your codebase. In 2019 HackerRank Developer Skills Report Professional growth & learning was marked as the most critical factor during looking for a new job.

The Repository pattern: a painless way to simplify your Go service logic

The Repository pattern: a painless way to simplify your Go service logic

I’ve seen a lot of complicated code in my life. Pretty often, the reason of that complexity was application logic coupled with database logic. Keeping logic of your application along with your database logic makes your application much more complex, hard to test, and maintain. There is already a proven and simple pattern that solves these issues. The pattern that allows you to separate your application logic from database logic. It allows you to make your code simpler and easier to add new functionalities.

Introduction to DDD Lite: When microservices in Go are not enough

Introduction to DDD Lite: When microservices in Go are not enough

When I started working in Go, the community was not looking positively on techniques like DDD (Domain-Driven Design) and Clean Architecture. I heard multiple times: “Don’t do Java in Golang!", “I’ve seen that in Java, please don’t!". These times, I already had almost 10 years of experience in PHP and Python. I’ve seen too many bad things already there. I remember all these “Eight-thousanders” (methods with +8k lines of code 😉) and applications that nobody wanted to maintain.

Business Applications in Go: Things to know about DRY

Business Applications in Go: Things to know about DRY

In case you’re here for the first time, this post is the next in our Business Applications in Go series. Previously, we introduced Wild Workouts, our example application built in a modern way with some subtle anti-patterns. We added them on purpose to present common pitfalls and tips on how to avoid them. In this post, we begin refactoring of Wild Workouts. Previous articles will give you more context, but reading them isn’t necessary to understand this one.

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